Category Archives: ACA

Medicaid & The American Health Care Act

It’s official—the 115th Congress has set its sights on overhauling the Medicaid program.  We predicted as much (here and here) shortly after the November 2016 presidential elections,  but now we have some insight into exactly what those proposed changes to Medicaid will be.

On March 6, 2017, the House Energy & Commerce Committee (E&C) and Ways & Means Committee (W&M) officially released draft legislation,… More

How the Medicaid expansion will be treated under a block-grant financing framework

One of the most pressing issues before the 115th Congress and newly inaugurated President Trump will be to determine how the Medicaid expansion population will fit into a broader reform package for the Medicaid program as a whole.  Many state governors in expansion states have expressed concern that the long-standing Republican proposal of block-granting Medicaid will leave them exposed to unsustainable financial pressures.

President Trump’s nominee for HHS Secretary,… More

Medicaid Directors: Trump Administration Should Formally Include States in Development of Medicaid Regulations

Introduction

Over the course of the last several blog posts, we’ve discussed how the Medicaid program could potentially be transformed under the incoming Trump Administration.  We also described the central role that state-led demonstration waivers would play in defining the parameters of this transformation.  Now, the association for State Medicaid directors is weighing in on precisely this issue.  The National Association of State Medicaid Directors (NAMD)recently published a document laying out the group’s priorities for the Medicaid program in the first 100 days of the incoming Trump Administration. … More

Medicaid under a Trump Administration: Rethinking the Medicaid Program

Last week, we wrote about the importance of the Medicaid program, especially given its size as, by far, the largest health insurance plan in the United States.  We noted that Medicaid covers 71 million people (this number increased dramatically after the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010).  We said that “Medicaid is important for all of us” – whether you are a program beneficiary, a taxpayer who helps pay for it,… More

Medicaid Program: Covered Outpatient Drugs, Final Rule with Comment Period Summary

On January 21, 2016, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published a long-awaited final rule entitled “Medicaid Program:  Covered Outpatient Drugs.”  CMS actually proposed this rule in February, 2012, so it’s taken almost four years for the agency to finalize the many policies on which they sought comment – almost all of which flow from the enactment of the federal health care reform law that was enacted in 2010,… More

Medicare and Medicaid Celebrate 50 Years

On July 30, the country marks the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the two programs into law.

I am very proud to say that I have been involved in health care law and policy for more than one-half of the lifetime of these important social programs. My first job out of college – right after the 15th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid –… More

The Supreme Court reaches a decision in Armstrong v. Exceptional Child Center

On March 31, the United States Supreme Court concluded, in a long-awaited decision, that the alleged failure of a state Medicaid plan to comply with the provisions of the federal Medicaid Act is not enforceable in the federal courts by alleging that the state plan has been adopted in violation of the Constitution’s Supremacy Clause. Armstrong v. Exceptional Child Center. The decision, while relatively narrow, (more on that in a bit) does seem to largely foreclose federal judicial enforcement of the requirements of the Medicaid statute against the states.… More

Could the same “state’s rights” argument that struck down the Medicaid expansion, save the subsidies?

To completely ignore the Supreme Court’s oral arguments last week in King v. Burwell would be a disservice to you, our readers. Even though this is a Medicaid blog, in a post-ACA world is it increasingly difficult to separate out the individual pieces of our insurance system.  The ACA (at least in how it was designed) was intended to create a continuum of coverage: Medicaid for the lowest income Americans,… More

Medicaid and Income Verification

The big news out of Ohio today is the announcement by the State Medicaid Director John McCarthy that, at the end of week, 61,000 Ohioans are set to lose their Medicaid coverage for failure to verify household income.  According to McCarthy, the federal government requires states to verify income each year to ensure that Medicaid recipients still qualify for coverage.

So what do the Federal rules and regulations say about Medicaid income verification?… More

What does Indiana mean for the future of Medicaid?

Note: for a fairly up-to-date analysis of where states stand on the Medicaid expansion, check out this nice break down by the Advisory Board.

As we previously discussed, the agreement between Indiana and CMS last week to expand Medicaid in that state has big implications for the Medicaid program.  First, Indiana’s agreement with CMS has seemed to trigger a handful of other Red States that now appear ready to rethink agreements with CMS.  … More

Presentation: Immigrant Access to Coverage Under the ACA and Medicaid

As if eligibility for public health insurance programs in the United States weren’t confusing enough, the issues become even more complicated when the applicant isn’t a U.S. citizen. This presentation (created by Editor Tom for a class he teaches at George Washington University), with a few case studies, walks through some of the pathways to coverage and even points out a few surprising results!

Click here to download the slides.… More