Tag Archives: Medicaid

New House of Representatives COVID Relief Bill Contains Multiple Medicaid Provisions

Here at the Medicaid and the Law Blog, we’ve spent the past couple of days going through the American Rescue Plan Act, legislation introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives last Friday that is the latest attempt by Congress to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.  There are several provisions of the legislation that would revise and expand the Medicaid program, and we thought it would be of interest to highlight them here. … More

CMS Indicates Reversal of Medicaid Work Requirements

On Friday, February 12, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) took a first step to ending Medicaid work requirements.  Acting CMS Administration Elizabeth Richter sent letters to Medicaid Directors in states which had previously received  1115 waiver approvals to implement so-called “community engagement” requirements, explaining CMS now does not believe that requiring employment as a condition for Medicaid coverage promotes the program’s objectives and intends to commence a process of determining whether to withdraw the waiver approvals. … More

President Biden Takes First Step Towards Reversing Trump Era Medicaid Policies

On January 28th, President Biden issued an “Executive Order on Strengthening Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act.” The E.O. states that the Biden Administration will promote policies that “protect and strengthen Medicaid and the ACA and … make high-quality healthcare accessible and affordable for every American.” To this end, the E.O. makes several important policy changes, including asking the HHS Secretary to establish a Special Enrollment Period for the ACA marketplace,… More

Outgoing HHS Secretary Files Supreme Court Brief Supporting Medicaid Work Requirements

On December 4, 2020, the Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments to decide the legality of the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’s) authorization for states to incorporate work requirements into their Medicaid programs.  The consolidated cases, Azar v. Gresham and Arkansas v. Gresham, challenge the legality of work requirements in two states’ Medicaid programs—Arkansas and New Hampshire.  On January 19,… More

CMS Issues New Guidance for States to Address Social Determinants of Health

Before discussing the new Medicaid guidance on social determinants of health, Medicaid and the Law would like to formally introduce its readers to Regina DeSantis, a new Law Clerk in the Washington, DC office who will become a regular contributor to the blog.

The social determinants of health (SDOH) describe the range of environmental, social, and economic factors that can impact health outcomes.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),… More

After Long Wait, HHS Announces Medicaid CARES Act Allocation

Well, we’ve been waiting for awhile and now it’s been made public:  the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced on June 9 that it was releasing $25 billion in funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act to high Medicaid providers and to safety net hospitals.  President Trump signed the CARES Act into law on March 27; the CARES law and a subsequent law appropriated $175 billion to a Provider Relief Fund to address the needs of healthcare providers that had increased expenses or lost revenues due to COVID-19. … More

The COVID-19 Pandemic is Demonstrating the Value of Telehealth and Medicaid is Poised to Capitalize

“Social distancing,” a euphemism for an infection prevention and containment strategy, will undoubtedly live in the annals of meme history for its incredibly disrupting effects on the world.  Fortunately, advancements in technology that allow one to upload the same memes to the internet have also enabled medical providers to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic by furnishing medical care, also known as “telehealth” or “telemedicine,” to their patients in the comfort (and safety) of their own homes,… More

Medicaid Long-Term Care: A Background and look at the Eligibility Rules

One of the most common misperceptions of the American health care system is that if an elderly individual – maybe a parent or a grandparent – has to enter a nursing home, their stay will be fully covered by the Medicare program.  But that is not accurate.  Medicare does not cover long-term care.  It will pay for up to 100 days in a skilled nursing facility per spell of illness,… More

Court Case Involving Massachusetts Health Care Law Shows Relationship Between Medicare Payments and Medicaid

In 2006, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney signed Chapter 58 of the Massachusetts Acts of 2006 into law.  Chapter 58 was designed to ensure that all Massachusetts residents would have access to some form of health insurance, and it accomplished this through reforms to the individual insurance market; subsidies to purchase health insurance; and an expansion of the Massachusetts Medicaid program, known as “MassHealth.”  Many observers have suggested that the enactment of Chapter 58 in Massachusetts paved the way for enactment of the Affordable Care Act at the federal level four years later (although Governor Romney strenuously denied this during his campaign for President in 2012).… More

Medicaid: A Winner in the 2018 Midterm Elections

Despite all of the drama surrounding the 2018 midterm elections, one thing was clear: Medicaid had a big night on November 6, 2018.

In particular, the electorate in the Red states of Nebraska, Idaho, and Utah voted to expand Medicaid (i.e. extend Medicaid coverage to low-income able-bodied adults).  Although the Montana electorate rejected a ballot measure that would have permanently funded the Medicaid expansion in that state beyond 2019,… More