Tag Archives: Medicaid

Summary and Considerations on CMS’ RFI on ‘Access to Coverage and Care in Medicaid & CHIP’

The Medicare and Medicaid programs themselves are not old enough to qualify for Medicare coverage (quick history lesson: President Lyndon Johnson signed the Social Security Amendments into law on July 30, 1965, and the Medicaid program launched on January 1, 1966; note that CMS traces the origin of its programs back to President Theodore Roosevelt’s advocacy for social insurance).  Over the past half-century (and then some),… More

Oregon’s New Waiver Request to Exclude Accelerated Approval Drugs from Medicaid Coverage

Hello readers! Today’s post focuses on a topic we’ve touched on a few times in the past – Medicaid drug formularies.

Back in December 2021, the state of Oregon released a draft Medicaid waiver proposal that caught the attention of many stakeholders. In the draft proposal, Oregon stated that it was considering asking CMS for approval to a) adopt a commercial-style closed drug formulary and b) exclude from Medicaid coverage certain drugs approved via the accelerated approval pathway “with limited or inadequate evidence of clinical efficacy.” Oregon proposed to “use its own rigorous review process to determine coverage of new drugs and to prioritize patient access to clinically proven,… More

New State Health Official Letter Extends Post-PHE Processing Timelines, Implements Redetermination Requirement

We’ve previously discussed the numerous flexibilities CMS offered state Medicaid programs to respond to local outbreaks and address health concerns associated with the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE).

Back in March 2020 (which feels like ages ago, right?) my colleague Tom discussed the enhanced 6.2% Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) funding—authorized by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and amended by the CARES Act—including the continuous-enrollment requirement for beneficiaries who had been enrolled in Medicaid on or after March 18,… More

‘Objective Falsity’ and the FCA: An Ongoing Circuit Split

The False Claims Act (“FCA”) is a Federal statute originally enacted in 1863 as a response to fraud from defense contractors during the American Civil War. Under the FCA (31 U.S.C. §§ 3729 – 3733), it is a crime for any person to knowingly submit false or fraudulent claims for payment to the United States government.  Those who violate the FCA are liable for treble damages plus a per-claim monetary penalty (calculated to align with inflation). … More

New House of Representatives COVID Relief Bill Contains Multiple Medicaid Provisions

Here at the Medicaid and the Law Blog, we’ve spent the past couple of days going through the American Rescue Plan Act, legislation introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives last Friday that is the latest attempt by Congress to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.  There are several provisions of the legislation that would revise and expand the Medicaid program, and we thought it would be of interest to highlight them here. … More

CMS Indicates Reversal of Medicaid Work Requirements

On Friday, February 12, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) took a first step to ending Medicaid work requirements.  Acting CMS Administration Elizabeth Richter sent letters to Medicaid Directors in states which had previously received  1115 waiver approvals to implement so-called “community engagement” requirements, explaining CMS now does not believe that requiring employment as a condition for Medicaid coverage promotes the program’s objectives and intends to commence a process of determining whether to withdraw the waiver approvals. … More

President Biden Takes First Step Towards Reversing Trump Era Medicaid Policies

On January 28th, President Biden issued an “Executive Order on Strengthening Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act.” The E.O. states that the Biden Administration will promote policies that “protect and strengthen Medicaid and the ACA and … make high-quality healthcare accessible and affordable for every American.” To this end, the E.O. makes several important policy changes, including asking the HHS Secretary to establish a Special Enrollment Period for the ACA marketplace,… More

Outgoing HHS Secretary Files Supreme Court Brief Supporting Medicaid Work Requirements

On December 4, 2020, the Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments to decide the legality of the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’s) authorization for states to incorporate work requirements into their Medicaid programs.  The consolidated cases, Azar v. Gresham and Arkansas v. Gresham, challenge the legality of work requirements in two states’ Medicaid programs—Arkansas and New Hampshire.  On January 19,… More

CMS Issues New Guidance for States to Address Social Determinants of Health

Before discussing the new Medicaid guidance on social determinants of health, Medicaid and the Law would like to formally introduce its readers to Regina DeSantis, a new Law Clerk in the Washington, DC office who will become a regular contributor to the blog.

The social determinants of health (SDOH) describe the range of environmental, social, and economic factors that can impact health outcomes.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),… More